Tag Archives: United States

Is it Christmas time already?! Not yet but almost! Things to do in December in LA.

by Moises Rodriguez, 2007.

Saturday, December 7, 2013 – Sunday, December 8, 2013

Experience the holiday season at Heritage Square as we present the 19th Annual Holiday Lamplight Celebration on Saturday and Sunday, December 7 and 8, with tours beginning at 4 p.m. Witness as the past becomes the present among the beautiful glow of Victorian homes at Heritage Square’s annual holiday event. Reservations are required. Admission price: $30 for Adults, $15 for Children over 6 years.* Members get 20% off tickets-limited and incremental to their member level.

*This program is not suitable for children under 6 years. As an evening tour, guest need to be aware of dimly lit conditions, walking on uneven surfaces, up and down steps, and long periods of standing.

http://heritagesquare.org/events/calendar/19th-annual-holiday-lamplight-celebration


What is this “Halloween” holiday anyway??!

Like many holiday’s these days, we play the marketing game and buy, buy, buy everything they tell us and end up broke until January. Also, like many holidays, most people do not know the history and origins of many of our traditions.  Here are some fun Halloween facts for you to get hip on and hopefully share with your kids so they also know what Halloween is all about!

Halloween’s roots can be traced back to Celtic culture in Ireland.  According to their “Druid” religion, November 1st was New Years’ on their calendar.   The celebration would begin on October 31st ,and last into the following day. The spirits of all who died in the prior year, would rise up and roam the earth on this night.  This is an evil night when spirits roamed the streets and villages. Lord Samhain, the lord of Darkness, would arrive in search of the spirits to take  them to the underworld.

  • Orange and black are Halloween colors because orange is associated with the Fall harvest and black is associated with darkness and death.
  • Jack o’ Lanterns originated in Ireland where people placed candles in hollowed-out turnips to keep away spirits and ghosts on the Samhain holiday.
  • Pumpkins also come in white, blue and green. Great for unique monster carvings!
  • Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who would celebrate the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance and tell fortunes.
  • Tootsie Rolls were the first wrapped penny candy in America.
  • The ancient Celts thought that spirits and ghosts roamed the countryside on Halloween night. They began wearing masks and costumes to avoid being recognized as human.
  • Halloween candy sales average about 2 billion dollars annually in the United States.
  • Chocolate candy bars top the list as the most popular candy for trick-or-treaters with Snickers #1.
  • Halloween is the 2nd most commercially successful holiday, with Christmas being the first.
  • Bobbing for apples is thought to have originated from the roman harvest festival that honors Pamona, the goddess of fruit trees.
  • Black cats were once believed to be witch’s familiars who protected their powers.

Some people view Halloween as a time for fun, putting on costumes, trick-or-treating, and having theme parties. Others view it as a time of superstitions, ghosts, goblins and evil spirits that should be avoided at all costs.

As the Christian debate goes on, celebrating Halloween is a preference that is not always viewed as participating in an evil holiday. Halloween is often celebrated with no reference to pagan rituals or the occult.

Traditional activities include trick-or-treating, bonfires, costume parties, visiting “haunted houses” and carving jack-o-lanterns. Irish and Scottish immigrants carried versions of the tradition to North America in the nineteenth century. Other western countries embraced the holiday in the late twentieth century including Ireland, the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom as well as of Australia and New Zealand.

Have a safe and fun holiday season.

 


Happy Birthday Groucho Marx!

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000050/

 

Born October 2, 1890!! NYC, NY

Julius Henry “Groucho” Marx (October 2, 1890[1] – August 19, 1977) was an American comedian and film and television star. He is known as a master of quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era.[2] His rapid-fire, often impromptu delivery of innuendo-laden patter earned him many admirers and imitators.

He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life.[3]

His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the world’s most ubiquitous and recognizable novelty disguises, known as “Groucho glasses“, a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and mustache.[4

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho_Marx


Victorian tea cups for men??! Who knew?

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Many Victorian men where known for their mustaches.  As a mater of fact they were judged by the size of their mustaches, so obviously this caused for embarrassing moments during tea time. 😉 So, the teacup for men was invented!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moustache_cup

“The moustache cup is a drinking cup with a semicircular ledge inside. The ledge has a half moon-shaped opening to allow the passage of liquids and serves as a guard to keep moustaches dry. It is generally acknowledged to have been invented in the 1860s by British potter Harvey Adams (born 1835).

Moustaches flourished throughout the Victorian era. Often, moustache wax was applied to the moustache to keep it nice and stiff, with every hair in place. And therein lay a problem that cropped up when steaming hot cups of tea or coffee were carried up to the mouth for sipping: the steam melted the wax and sent it right into the cup. Another problem soon became apparent. Sipping hot tea or coffee, moustaches also often became stained. Finally, Harvey Adams, an innovative Englishman, in 1860 came up with an unusual invention, “the moustache cup”. The latter had a ledge, called a moustache guard, across the cup. The ledge had one semicircular opening against the side of the cup. The pampered moustache then rested safe and dry on the guard while sipping a hot beverage through the opening. The new invention spread all over the European continent and soon, every famous potter was making the new cups. A multiplicity of moustache cups were made by famous manufactories such as Meissen, Royal Crown Derby, Imari, Royal Bayreuth, Limoges and others. Each potter created his own version of this masculine tableware and the news of that invention soon spread to America.”

Vintage Victorian Image Digital Download Tag Advertisement Card Scrapbook - Moustache Mustache Wax


Vintage 101: Who are these girls called…”flappers”?

Flappers were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.[1] Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flapper

OH MY!

The slang word flapper, describing a young woman, is sometimes supposed to refer to a young bird flapping its wings while learning to fly. However, it may derive from an earlier use in northern England to mean teenage girl, referring to one whose hair is not yet put up and whose plaited pigtail flapped on her back;[2] or from an older word meaning prostitute.[3]

The slang word “flap” is known to have been used for a young prostitute as early as 1631.[4] By the 1890s the word “flapper” was emerging in England as popular slang both for a very young prostitute,[5][6] and in a more general – and less derogatory sense – of any lively mid-teenage girl.[7]

In the 1920s, however, many Americans found the flapper incredibly threatening. Flappers represented a new moral order.  Although they were the daughters of the middle class, they flouted middle-class values.   They shrugged off their chaperones.  Worse still, they danced suggestively and openly flirted with boys.  Flappers prized style over substance, novelty over tradition, and pleasure over virtue.

 


The New L.A. Folk Fest presents a “Happening” at HM157

Cover Photo

Return to the birthplace of the Folk Fest!
Featuring: The Americans, White Dove, Turn On The Sunlight, The Melodic, Emily Lacy, Kirpatrick (from Spindrift), Song Preservation Society, Ghiant, Vision Quest, Moomaw, Bloody Death Skull, AND MORE…As always, we will fit in as many bands as we can!
$20 ticket includes free drinks and other goodies! RSVP REQUIRED. RSVP on Facebook or email lafolkfest@gmail.com … We’re working on some big things, so this event is a fundraiser as much as it a way to get together and enjoy some summer fun.
Proceeds will also be donated to the California State Parks Foundation from this event & all events that we do between now and next summer. Save the parks!
Co-presented by The New LA Folk Fest, L.A. Record, and All Scene Eye
Want to participate? Sponsors, donors, services, volunteers, brands, contact lafolkfest@gmail.comHistorical Monument #157, also referred to as The Horace P Dibble House, is a community creative collective space on the California Historical landmark list, voted “Best Underground Date Night” and “Best Escape From Corporate Entertainment” by the L.A. Weekly.


Great early car chase scene “Get that Girl” (1932)

This is a great movie and I really enjoyed the car chase scene in the beginning.  It’s amazing how far we have come cinematically with graphics and CGI,  but I still appreciate our humble beginning’s!

Synopsis: A young girl, who is about to receive a large inheritance, is abducted to an isolated sanitarium where a crazed doctor is performing strange experiments.


What a crackup!!!!! Just Imagine (1930)

This movie was extremely cheesy but simply hilarious how they viewed what the future would be….in the 1980’s that is!!

Check out this clip if you want a good laugh for all you 80’s babies…man if they only knew!!

Pre-Code humor: “She’s not the Queen, HE is!” Joyzelle in her mica costume.


Happy 100 Vintage Wonderlust!!!!!

This is my 100th post!! Time flies when you are having fun, and I still have tons of ideas to write about.  Have no fear, I’m just getting warmed up with my blog.  I appreciate all of the viewers and would like to remind you to please like the posts you enjoy most so I can see what my audience desires!!  Thank you for all of your support and please, keep coming back for more!! I update several times a week.

Happy 100!!

NYC in 1913, 100 years ago!

Los Angeles 1913

San Francisco 1913

Newspapers from 1913

Alabama Citizen newspaper 1913

Facts from 1913:

  • Darktown Follies opens in Harlem and helps to make Harlem a black cultural center.
  • Billboard magazine publishes a list of the most popular vaudeville  songs. It’s the predecessor to their trademark charts.
  • First crossword puzzle appears in the New York World. See Crossword  Puzzle Guide

Economics

Federal spending:   $0.72  billion Consumer Price Index:   9.9 Unemployment:   4.3% Cost of a first-class  stamp:   $0.02
Read more:  Top News Stories from 1913 | Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/year/1913.html#ixzz2ZVxCjo5u

For the first time, American motorists can drive coast-to-coast via the Lincoln Highway, which goes from New York’s Time Square to Lincoln Park in San Francisco, Calif.

The average house cost $5,935 Equivalent today: $131,171

The average car cost $600 Equivalent today: $13,261

The average wage was $585 Equivalent today: $12,929
Here are some ads from 1913
Women’s fashion in 1913:
Random 1913 Photos:
Thanks again for the support and keep coming back!!!

That’s LA??!!

Corner of Main, Spring, and Ninth streets in downtown Los Angeles, 1939.

 


Happy Birthday James Cagney!!

James Francis Cagney, Jr. (July 17, 1899 – March 30, 1986) was an American actor, first on stage, then in film,[2] where he had his greatest impact. Although he won acclaim and major awards for a wide variety of performances,[3] he is best remembered for playing tough guys.[4] In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked him eighth among its 50 Greatest American Screen Legends.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cagney#cite_note-2

To see all of his wonderful movies check out my most favorite reference site:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000010/


Culture is calling! Though Aug. 9: Frida Kahlo Exhibit at Corazon de Los Angeles on Olvera Street

What better place to view such lovely art than in the historic downtown Los Angeles Olvera Street.  Frida Kahlo Exhibit at Corazon de Los Angeles on Olvera Street. Mixed media, multi-artist exhibit features George Yepes, Yolanda Gonzalez, Magda Bowen, Lani Cupchoy, Mirlette Islas, Lorena Rivera, Jorge Guillen, Johnny Rivera & array of Frida themed nichos & jewelry.  Corazon is located at W-19A (upstairs) Olvera St./634 N. Main St. LA 90012. For more information, call (323) 341-7970, email info@corazonla.com or on Facebook Corazon-de-Los-Angeles-at-Olvera-Street.

Pictured: “Frida on Wood ” by Maria Kane

Frida, Original on Wood-By Maria Kane 1


Womens right to vote

As a woman born with this right, it is easy to forget the brave women who fought for this right and the Amendment 19 on August 19, 1920. Also known as the women’s suffrage act, this right was fought for many years before it passed.  To this very day there is still plenty of suffrage and lack of equal rights for women around the world and I think we should all take time to appreciate what we have here in the United States, and other countries where women are allowed to vote and take office.  The women that took on this battle had to hear all of the criticisms and attempted to be held back by the lack of equal education opportunities and yet  they were strong and fought hard and got us where we are  today.

Thank you to all the unknown soldiers in the photo’s below.  My daughter thanks you as well.

*Interesting fact*

Votes for women were first seriously proposed in the United States in July, 1848, at the Seneca Falls Woman’s Rights Convention organized by  Elizabeth Cady Stanton and  Lucretia Mott. One woman who attended that convention was Charlotte Woodward. She was nineteen at the time. In 1920, when women finally won the vote throughout the nation, Charlotte Woodward was the only participant in the 1848 Convention who was still alive to be able to vote, though she was apparently too ill to actually cast a ballot.


Places you must see if you are visiting Los Angeles!

If you want to make a day and visit vintage Los Angeles, you must take a trip to first the Union Station.  This beautiful landmark  opened in May 1939 as the Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, replacing the older La Grande Station and Central Station. One of a number of union stations built in the early 1900s it served trains from the Union Pacific, Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Railways. Built on a grand scale, Union Station became known as “Last of the Great Railway Stations” built in the United States. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

It is really beautiful and the main station looks almost exactly as it did when it was first opened.  This has been the site of MANY movies including the most recent Gangster Squad.  Its a classic part of Los Angeles history and a must see during your next visit!

Next stop should be Olivera Street. http://olvera-street.com/

Olvera Street is in the oldest part of Downtown Los Angeles, California, and is part of the El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument. Many Latinos refer to it as “La Placita Olvera.” Since 1911 it was described as Sonora Town.

Having started as a short lane, Wine Street, it was extended and renamed in honor of Agustín Olvera, a prominent local judge, in 1877. There are 27 historic buildings lining Olvera Street, including the Avila Adobe, the Pelanconi House and the Sepulveda House. In 1930, it was converted to a colorful Mexican marketplace.

There is lots of art and culture to be found in this area and a great way to spend the day!

 

Please check the main website for events as it is always more fun when there are things going on! There is lots of good places to get something to eat in the area so get ready to spend the day walking, shopping, and eating!


Fun can be free…Griffith Observatory

Photo: Photo of the Day: Romantic Sunset Griffith Observatory http://bit.ly/ZShIaN (Photo courtesy of Rafaelinho, Flickr)

Griffith Observatory is an icon of Los Angeles, a national leader in public astronomy, a beloved civic gathering place, and one of southern California’s most popular attractions. The Observatory is located on the southern slope of Mount Hollywood in Griffith Park, just above the Los Feliz neighborhood. It is 1,134 feet above sea level and is visible from many parts of the Los Angeles basin.

The mission of Griffith Observatory is inspiring everyone to observe, ponder, and understand the sky.

Griffith Observatory
2800 East Observatory Road
Los Angeles, CA  90027
(213) 473-0800

Weekdays (Tuesday – Friday): Open 12:00 noon – 10:00 p.m

Weekends (Saturday – Sunday):  Open  10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

Closed Mondays

If you have never been to the Observatory then you must at least once in your life.  Get to experience the stars through professional telescopes and see the stars like never before!!