Tag Archives: History

Happy 75th anniversary Wizard of Oz

Wow, has it really been 75 years?? Yes it has.

To celebrate they are showing it in 3D at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood.

http://www.ticketmaster.com/venueartist/90160/887597?brand=pantagesca

http://thewizardofoz.warnerbros.com/

To celebrate here are some great behind the scene shots from the movie!!

548965_430171547096117_457074168_n[1] 946362_429914700455135_1586347058_n[1]

 

 

 

 


1920sTheme Casino Night in Pomona August 1st!!!


Womens right to vote

As a woman born with this right, it is easy to forget the brave women who fought for this right and the Amendment 19 on August 19, 1920. Also known as the women’s suffrage act, this right was fought for many years before it passed.  To this very day there is still plenty of suffrage and lack of equal rights for women around the world and I think we should all take time to appreciate what we have here in the United States, and other countries where women are allowed to vote and take office.  The women that took on this battle had to hear all of the criticisms and attempted to be held back by the lack of equal education opportunities and yet  they were strong and fought hard and got us where we are  today.

Thank you to all the unknown soldiers in the photo’s below.  My daughter thanks you as well.

*Interesting fact*

Votes for women were first seriously proposed in the United States in July, 1848, at the Seneca Falls Woman’s Rights Convention organized by  Elizabeth Cady Stanton and  Lucretia Mott. One woman who attended that convention was Charlotte Woodward. She was nineteen at the time. In 1920, when women finally won the vote throughout the nation, Charlotte Woodward was the only participant in the 1848 Convention who was still alive to be able to vote, though she was apparently too ill to actually cast a ballot.


What to do this weekend? Try Lummis Day @ Heritage Square in LA

onlineposter

Check out the schedule to see what they have to offer! http://www.lummisday.org/2013/index.php/schedule

Music, dance, poetry and art representing a rainbow of cultural traditions will be presented at the eighth annual Lummis Day Festival, Sunday, June 2. The multi-site Festival, one of L.A.’s signature cultural events, runs from 10:30am-7:00pm.

The main stages for Lummis Day’s performances will again be located at Heritage Square Museum (3800 Homer Street), where the best of home-grown Northeast L.A. music, dance, food and community resources will be presented amid the historic buildings preserved on the unique museum’s grounds. Some of the historic buildings at Heritage Square Museum will be available to festival-goers via docent-led tours.

As always, the two-part Festival’s opening morning event will take place at Lummis Home (200 East Avenue 43), where the day begins at 10:30 AM with readings by critically acclaimed poets. The Lummis Home site will also feature music, art exhibits and refreshments. The Festival’s art exhibit will continue at Lummis Home until 5pm while performances—music, dance—and community activities shift to nearby Heritage Square Museum, beginning at 12:30pm. Visitors to Lummis Home can enjoy the interior of the century-old home, influenced by mission architecture and the dwellings of the Pueblo Indians, and can stroll through the beautiful native plant gardens that surround the building.

 


Hollywood History

When Spanish explorers first entered the area now known as Hollywood, Native Americans were living in the canyons of the Santa Monica  Mountains. Before long, the Indians had been moved to missions and the land which Hollywood now occupies was divided in two by the Spanish Government. Acreage to the west became part of Rancho La Brea and settlements to the  East became Rancho Los Feliz.

By the 1870s an agricultural community flourished in  the area and crops ranging from hay and grain to  subtropical bananas and pineapples were thriving. During the 1880s, the Ranchos were sub-divided. In 1886, H. H.Wilcox bought an area of Rancho La Brea that his wife then christened “Hollywood.” Within a few years, Wilcox had devised a grid plan for his new  community, paved Prospect Avenue (now Hollywood  Boulevard) for his main street and was selling large  residential lots to wealthy Midwesterners looking to build homes so they could “winter in California.”

Prospect Avenue soon became a prestigious residential street populated with large Queen Anne, Victorian, and Mission Revival houses. Mrs. Daeida Wilcox raised funds to build churches, schools and a library and Hollywood quickly became a complete and prosperous community. This location of prime real estate was later named “Hollywoodland” in 1923.

In 1911, the Nestor Company opened Hollywood’s first film studio in an old tavern on the corner of Sunset and Gower. Not long thereafter Cecil B. DeMille and D. W.  Griffith began making movies in the area drawn to the community for its open space and moderate climate.

The Hollywood sign soon became an American cultural icon of movie stars and film location so it became an official landmark and the “land” was dropped in 1949.

Hollywood tidbits and facts:

In 1906, a streetcar line was constructed in the Hollywood district down the middle of “Sandy Road”. This lane was known as the “Rose City Line”. The establishment of the streetcar route facilitated the growth of the suburb of Hollywood.

In 1923, Harry Chandler, a real estate agent and investor built the famous Hollywood Sign to advertise the area “Hollywoodland”. The total expense for this advertisement was $21,000. Initially, it was built to last only for eighteen months. However, as of today, the Hollywood Sign has lasted for eighty years.

In 1939, four thousand twenty-watt bulbs were put to illuminate the signboard and a caretaker was appointed to maintain the same. The part of land, which included the “Hollywood” sign, was sold to the city of LA.

The alphabets of the signboard began to fall down. To restore the same, in 1978 an auction of the alphabets was held by Hugh Hefner, founder of the magazine “Playboy”. This auction was held for a period of three months. Alice Cooper, American rock singer, sponsored the alphabet “O”. Gene Autry and Paul Williams sponsored the alphabets “L” and “W” respectively.

In 1995, a trust known as “Hollywood Sign Trust” was set up to maintain the Hollywood sign.

 Mary Pickford

Hollywood is just as interesting to visit today and the city’s culture and crazy crowds makes for interesting people watching.


Los Angeles, a long time ago…..

Things in Los Angeles change so quickly. Even in my short 33 years in this area, I can easily find myself lost in familiar areas as development is like an infectious disease.  I only say that as I am a fan of restoration and not demolition and re-development. *sigh*

Here is a picture of the late 1890s on Third Street.  It’s breathtaking!

Here is something you may or may not know but you can still experience Victorian neighborhoods in Los Angeles.  To my surprise and discovery last year of the Angelino Heights!!

http://historicechopark.org/id58.html

Angelino Heights, located to the east of Echo Park Lake and north of the 101 Freeway, remains a unique and remarkably well preserved section of Victorian-era Los Angeles.

There is over 50 jaw dropping Victorian homes


Femme Fatale: Love, Lies, and the Unknown Life of Mata Hari

Femme Fatale: Love, Lies, and the Unknown Life of Mata Hari

This is an absolute must rest for anyone who is interested in the life of a Victorian spy.  Mata Hari is the original femme fatale.  Although its really up to you to decide if she was an actual spy or was she just a lover of many military men and a fan of the finer things in life.  I read this entire book almost cover to cover in one day as I was glued!

A quick synopsis is:

Mata Hari was the stage name Dutch-born Margaretha Zelle took when she became one of Paris’ most popular exotic dancers on the eve of World War I. Although details of her past are sketchy, it is believed that she was born in the Netherlands in 1876 and married a Dutch Army officer 21 years her senior when she was 18. She quickly bore him two children and followed him when he was assigned to Java in 1897. The marriage proved rocky. The couple returned to the Netherlands in 1902 with their daughter (their other child, a son, had died mysteriously in Java). Margaretha’s husband obtained a divorce and retained custody of his daughter.

Margaretha then made her way to Paris where she reinvented herself as an Indian temple dancer thoroughly trained in the erotic dances of the East. She took on the name Mata Hari and was soon luring audiences in the thousands as she performed in Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Madrid and other European capitals. She also attracted a number of highly-placed, aristocratic lovers willing to reward her handsomely for the pleasure of her company.

With the outbreak of World War I, Mata Hari’s cross-border liaisons with German political and military figures came to the attention of the French secret police and she was placed under surveillance. Brought in for questioning, the French reportedly induced her to travel to neutral Spain in order to develop relationships with the German naval and army attaches in Madrid and report any intelligence back to Paris. In the murky world of the spy, however, the French suspected her of being a double agent. In February 1917 Mata Hari returned to Paris and immediately arrested; charged with being a German spy. Her trial in July revealed some damning evidence that the dancer was unable to adequately explain. She was convicted and sentenced to death.

In the early-morning hours of October 15, Mata Hari was awakened and taken by car from her Paris prison cell to an army barracks on the city’s outskirts where she was to meet her fate.

“I am ready.”

 
 

Visit your local Victorian – today’s house is the Heritage House in Riverside, CA

Visit your local Victorian – today’s house is the Heritage House in Riverside, CA

I have been to this house several times as they always have a full calendar of events.  Please check the site and pick any of the wonderful events they hold on site.  My personal favorite is the Chinese Moon festival.  As always a grand family event with free crafts, music, tours, and food to buy.

8193 Magnolia Avenue
Riverside, CA 92504
(951) 826-5273 (RMM)

Heritage House & Gift Shop Hours
Open September from the 1st weekend after labor day to June. (Closed July and August.)
Friday:  Noon – 3 pm
Saturday: Noon – 3:30 pm
Sunday: Noon – 3:30 pm
Closed Monday – Thursday & Major Holidays. Open for special events.
PLEASE ARRIVE 45 MINUTES BEFOFE CLOSING


Tidbits and Facts

Some Los Angeles history for you, the very first payphone….
The first telephone pay station in Los Angeles, at 228 S. Spring Street, 1899. The service was not cheap: that 50¢ per minute call to San Francisco would cost $13.58 per minute in today’s dollars.
(Source: photos.lapl.org )
483554_580420215311253_764880_n[1]