Let’s get a little twisted…Vintage Serial Killer HH Holmes

There is a great documentary on him on Netflix I definitely recommend!! I was glued to my seat by the thought that was put into his plot and how easy it was to get a way with it back then.  If you disappeared no one could notice for months or even years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._H._Holmes

Herman Webster Mudgett (May 16, 1861[1] – May 7, 1896[2]), better known under the alias of Dr. Henry Howard Holmes, was one of the first documented American serial killers in the modern sense of the term. In Chicago at the time of the 1893 World’s Fair, Holmes opened a hotel which he had designed and built for himself specifically with murder in mind, and which was the location of many of his murders. While he confessed to 27 murders, of which four were confirmed, his actual body count could be as high as 200.[3] He took an unknown number of his victims from the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, which was less than two miles away, to his “World’s Fair” hotel.

Holmes had acquired a vacant lot on the corner of Wallace and 63rd Street, Chicago, shortly before the Fair’s opening, and had quickly built his three-story block long “Castle” on the site. The ground floor contained only run of the mill shops, including Holmes’s drugstore, but the upper two floors gained international notoriety after they were found to contain, apart from innocent seeming guest suites, a maze of over one hundred interconnected hallways and smaller rooms. Blind corridors, secret passageways and senseless stairways that lead nowhere abounded and at least one chute lead directly from the suites down into Holmes’s basement torture chambers.

Holmes was not picky and his victims were culled mainly from ex-lovers who had originally been tricked into visiting him by reading his enticing advertisements in lonely hearts’ publications. He also preyed freely on hotel guests and hotel employees. He usually killed his victims by gassing them in the hotel rooms, whose doors, once closed, could not be opened from the inside. He would then maneuver the corpses down to the basement via the chute. Once in the basement, he either dismembered the bodies and disposed of the pieces in lime pits, or dissected them and sold the skeletons to a nearby medical school. He also apparently ran an abortion clinic from the hotel premises but this clinic quickly gained a reputation for one where the patients had an extremely high fatality rate …

Holmes also forced all of his employees to take out insurance policies on their lives with him as their beneficiary. After these employees had disappeared, and were presumed dead by the various insurance companies involved, Holmes would then cash the policies in. And although this happened time and time again, no one realized that Holmes was killing these people simply to file claims on their policies. Towards the end of his career, Holmes rightly considered himself to be an expert on insurance fraud and it is therefore ironic that, despite his undeniable talent in this area, he was finally brought low because of a botched insurance scam.


The Knickerbocker Hotel- Tidbits and Facts on an old Hollywood landmark

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knickerbocker_Hotel_%28Los_Angeles%29

Hotel Knickerbocker served as a temporary home to Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, Rudolph Valentino, Three Stooges, Francis Farmer and some still live there in spirit.

The Renaissance Revival bar was a popular spot for celebrities. Silent screen star Rudolph Valentino was known to ride his horse down from the hills and dance the tango to the live music in this bar. Marilyn Monroe used to sneak through the kitchen in order to meet up with Joe Dimaggio.

When making movies, Elvis Presley liked to stay in Suite 1016. In fact, the song “Heartbreak Hotel” was written about the Knickerbocker by Hoyt Axton’s mother. Some of his publicity shots were taken inside the hotel.

Frances Farmer, who had a brilliant career in the 1930s and 1940s, turned to alcohol and drugs. She was arrested at the Knickerbocker after getting into a fight and dragged out half-naked. She was taken to a sanitarium where she was abused and eventually given a lobotomy. (Actual pic below of the arrest!)

Famous film director D.W. Griffith died of a stroke in 1948. He was living on the 10th floor and collapsed in the lobby under the art deco chandelier. He had turned to alcohol and Hollywood disowned him. Later, he was remembered as a brilliant director and, in 1999, a plaque honoring Griffith was placed in the lobby at the Knickerbocker.

Irene Gibbons, who designed costumes for famous actresses such as Judy Garland, Elizabeth Taylor and Marlene Dietrich, committed suicide at the Knickerbocker in 1962. She went into a deep depression after the death of actor Gary Cooper, whom she loved.

Bess Houdini, widow of Harry Houdini, conducted annual séances on Halloween night on the rooftop of the Knickerbocker. She did this for 10 years until 1936. During the first séance, thunder and lightning began. It was believed that this storm was limited to the top of the hotel and was not seen anywhere else in the Hollywood.

“The Hollywood Knickerbocker Apartments, formerly the Knickerbocker Hotel, is a senior home located at 1714 Ivar Avenue in Los Angeles, California. Built in 1925 by E.M. Frasier in Spanish Colonial Revival style, the historic hotel catered to the region’s nascent film industry, and is the site for some of Hollywood’s most famous dramatic moments. Rudolf Valentino was a regular at the bar before his death in 1926.”


The Hollywood Connection: Photographs and Autographs ONLINE AUCTION

Tomorrow there will be an internet-only auction for original vintage stills and portraits showcasing many Hollywood legends, including Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable, Bogart, and Rita Hayworth. Also included are signed film books with autographs by the likes of Elizabeth Taylor, Bob Hope, Orson Welles, Sidney Poitier, the Fondas, Bette Davis, and Charlton Heston. Here is a link to the catalog for more info.

JustElizabeth

http://issuu.com/haxbee/docs/photoauctioncataloghi-res

http://www.icollector.com/Hollywood-Photography-Autographs_as28470

The glamour and myth of Hollywood was built during the 1930s and ’40s by stars like Marilyn Monroe, Clara Bow, Clark Gable, Elizabeth Taylor, Humphrey Bogart, Fred Astaire, Greta Garbo and others. These timeless stars continue to awe, inspire and entertain us today. Blacksparrow Auctions is pleased to present a collection of original vintage stills and portraits that showcase the enduring magnetism and romance of Hollywood. Some of the highlight photos include scenes from There’s No Business Like Show Business with Marilyn Monroe, keybook stills of Clara Bow, Jean Harlow portraits, Humphrey Bogart stills from Key Largo, and many more. The collection includes Hollywood royalty such as Steve McQueen, Ingrid Bergman, Rita Hayworth, Errol Flynn, The Marx Brothers, Jayne Mansfield, Brigitte Bardot and Greta Garbo. Also featured are film stills from Stanley Kubrick films, Creature From the Black Lagoon, The Misfits, Bonnie and Clyde, The Three Stooges, and Alfred Hitchcock films. Altogether the collection spans the 1920s, pre-Code and silent era to the 1970s.

We are further excited to bring you a unique collection of signed film books that include autographs from some of the greatest actors and performers of the silver screen. One of the books, entitled The Bad Guys, contains dozens of signatures from some of Hollywood’s most memorable villains: James Cagney, Bette Davis, Edward G. Robinson, Cesar Romero, Joan Crawford, Boris Karloff, Vincent Price and more. Another book, entitled The Fondas, contains over 250 autographs of actors, directors and producers who have worked with Henry, Peter and Jane Fonda, including Olivia De Havilland, Sandra Dee, Alice Faye, Mel Ferrer, George Hamilton, Elsa Lanchester, Dorothy Lamour, Fred MacMurray, Roddy McDowell, Burgess Meredith, Gregory Peck and so many, many more. There are 37 of these books, all filled with scores of original autographs collected over seven decades by a former journalist and studio publicist. This is an impressive and incomparable compilation that will be the cornerstone of any Hollywood autograph collection.

 


Bettie Page….the side you DIDN’T know

Pin-up beauty Bettie Page’s mugshot from October 29th 1972.  Many of Bettie’s fans don’t seem to know that she left the pinup world and became a religious fanatic. Years later she was diagnosed of having ( acute schizophrenia ) and she ev…entually spent 20 months in a state mental institution because she stabbed three people. A husband and wife the first time, and her 66 year old roommate the second time because she said that ( God inspired her to do it ) She died at the age of 85.

What was the dark secret of Bettie Page—the curvaceous  black-banged pinup goddess who titillated 1950s America with S&M poses, abandoned her career in 1957, and disappeared? Other bios have chronicled her subsequent incarnations as an evangelical Christian, suburban housewife, and English teacher. But journalist Richard Foster, in his sensationalistic, albeit scrupulously researched book, The Real Bettie Page: The Truth About the Queen of the Pinups, reveals that in 1979 and 1982, Page (a diagnosed schizophrenic) tried to stab several people to death and was institutionalized and spent her last days as a recluse. She also made several foster attempts, clumsily, to reconcile her victimized childhood with her mental illness.

A cult figure, Page was most famous for the estimated 20,000 4-by-5-inch black-and-white glossy photographs taken by amateur shutterbugs from 1949 to 1957. The photos showed her in high heels and bikinis or negligees, bondage apparel — or nothing at all.

Decades later, those images inspired biographies, comic books, fan clubs, websites, commercial products — Bettie Page playing cards, dress-up magnet sets, action figures, Zippo lighters, shot glasses — and, in 2005,  a film about her life and times, “The Notorious Bettie Page.”

“I want to be remembered,” she said, “as I was when I was young and in my golden times. . . . I want to be remembered as the woman who changed people’s perspectives concerning nudity in its natural form.”

Her life to an amazing twist at 35, Page walked away from it all. She quit modeling and moved to Florida, where she married a much younger man whose passions, she later learned, were watching television and eating hamburgers.

Page fled from her home in tears after a dispute on New Year’s Eve in 1959. Down the street, she noticed a white neon sign over a little white church with its door open.

After quietly taking a seat in the back, she had a born-again experience. Page immersed herself in Bible studies and served as a counselor for the Billy Graham Crusade.

In 1967, she married for a third time. After that marriage ended in divorce 11 years later, Page plunged into a depression marked by violent mood swings. She argued with her landlady and attacked her with a knife. A judge found her innocent by reason of insanity but sentenced her to 10 years in a California mental institution.

She spent most of her final years in a one-bedroom apartment, reading the Bible, listening to Christian and country tunes, watching westerns on television, catching up on diet and exercise regimens or sometimes perusing secondhand clothing stores.


TOMORROW!! Irvine, CA


Vintage 101: Who are these girls called…”flappers”?

Flappers were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.[1] Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flapper

OH MY!

The slang word flapper, describing a young woman, is sometimes supposed to refer to a young bird flapping its wings while learning to fly. However, it may derive from an earlier use in northern England to mean teenage girl, referring to one whose hair is not yet put up and whose plaited pigtail flapped on her back;[2] or from an older word meaning prostitute.[3]

The slang word “flap” is known to have been used for a young prostitute as early as 1631.[4] By the 1890s the word “flapper” was emerging in England as popular slang both for a very young prostitute,[5][6] and in a more general – and less derogatory sense – of any lively mid-teenage girl.[7]

In the 1920s, however, many Americans found the flapper incredibly threatening. Flappers represented a new moral order.  Although they were the daughters of the middle class, they flouted middle-class values.   They shrugged off their chaperones.  Worse still, they danced suggestively and openly flirted with boys.  Flappers prized style over substance, novelty over tradition, and pleasure over virtue.

 


Happy Birthday Lucy!!

As a HUGE fan of  “I Love Lucy” and owner of every season I must say, I love Lucille Ball OUTSIDE from the known TV series.

Before she became a television superstar she was a contract player for RKO and Columbia Pictures. Happy birthday Miss Lucille Ball born August 6th , 1911 in Jamestown , N.Y.

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I also love the fact that she was one of the Zeigfeld Follies Girls!

Check out this video/bio on Lucy.  AMAZING pictures I have never seen before!!

 


Old Hollywood like you have never seen before 1920s style…!!

If you are from Southern California, and frequent the downtown Los Angeles and the immediate surrounding areas, then all of the pictures below are really going to hit home.  I can honestly say I have been to every one of these areas and it amazes me to see how it all began.  Enjoy!!

(1922)*^ – Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks hang the entrance signs for their Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood.

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(ca. 1923)^# – About a dozen men cheering for the camera in what seems to be the completion of an early phase of the new housing development project. At the same time, construction crews appear to still be working.

(ca. 1924)* – Three cars are parked in the street in front of a sign for Hollywoodland sales. To the right is the tract office building. Behind that another building is under construction. Another at the top of the hill looks nearly finished.

(ca. 1924)* – The construction sign in back reads “You are now in Hollywoodland, Tray E. Shoults Co.”. In the street in front of the Tract Office and other buildings approx. 70 men in a line 2 to 3 rows deep stand at the gates of Beachwood Drive.

(ca. 1920s)* – Intersection of Sunset and Cahuenga boulevards with heavy traffic going in all directions. The tall tower in the center of the photo is the Hollywood Athletic Club.

Historical Notes

When the Hollywood Athletic Club was first built in 1924, Hollywood was entering its greatest and most productive period. The building was the tallest building in Hollywood and loomed above Sunset Boulevard. Membership was originally $150 for initiation fees and $10 for monthly dues.

During its early years as a health club, its membership included Johnny Weissmuller, Errol Flynn, Charlie Chaplin, John Wayne, Walt Disney, John Ford, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., Mary Pickford, Cecil B de Mille, Cornel Wilde, Humphrey Bogart, Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, Frances X. Bushman, Howard Hughes, Joan Crawford and Rudolph Valentino, Mae West, Walt Disney, and Buster Crabbe.*^

(1929)* – Street view of the Hollywood Athletic Club, located at 6525 Sunset Blvd.

(1922)* – Around 50,000 people gathered for the Easter sunrise service in the Hollywood Bowl. An even larger crowd was expected there on Easter morning when the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra played for the worshipers. The Hollywood Bowl would officially be opened four months later (July 11, 1922).

(ca. 1923)* – Bird’s eye view looking west on Hollywood Blvd. at Cahuenga circa 1923.

(ca. 1923)* – A view of the courtyard of Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre with statues of an Egyptian king, Indian elephants. Billboard advertising for Douglas Fairbanks “The Thief of Bagdad.” The theatre opened in 1922 and was designed by architects Meyer & Holler.

Historical Notes

The Egyptian Theatre was the venue for the first-ever Hollywood premiere, Robin Hood, starring Douglas Fairbanks, on Wednesday, October 18, 1922. As the film reportedly cost over $1 million to produce, the admission price to the premiere was $5.00. One could reserve a seat up to two weeks in advance for the daily performances. Evening admission was 75¢, $1.00 or $1.50. The film was not shown in any other Los Angeles theater during that year.

(1927)* – Night view shows theater lights and throngs of fans packing the streets for blocks around Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. Publicity of Hollywood premiers usually brought stars and other distinguished visitors to magnificent events such as the one seen here – possibly the opening night of a movie starring Douglas Fairbanks.

(1928)* – Marquee says to “Watch for the Grand Opening” of Warner Bros. Theatre in Hollywood.

(1928)* – A customer gets full service at the gas pumps at Muller Bros. Service Station on Sunset Blvd.

Historical Notes

The Muller Brothers Service Station was located across Sunset Boulevard on 4 acres, where the Cinerama Dome Theater is now located. Opened in 1920 by the Muller brothers, Walter and Frank, this became the largest service station in the world (including a large automobile supply center), employing 120 people by 1937. Celebrities, from Rudolph Valentino to Clark Gable, came by regularly to get gas or just work on their cars. In 1963 the site was sold for the Cinerama Dome Theater, and, at that time, an eventual hotel.

(ca. 1928)* – Exterior view of the Gower Street entrance of the RKO Studios, located on Gower Street and Melrose Avenue in Hollywood. The studios were established by Robertson-Cole in 1921 and are now owned by CBS Paramount Television. RKO is short for Radio-Keith-Orpheum.

(ca. 1930s)^ – Carpenter’s Sandwich drive-in on Sunset and Vine. Two carhops are posing for the camera by the counter while another to the right appears to be serving food.

(1933)* – A man sits on a steel girder on the half-completed dome of the Griffith Observatory as other construction workers are on scaffolds on the building behind the dome. Construction rubble is scattered around the Observatory’s foundation.

(1934)* – The Griffith Observatory and the main building, the planetarium, are seen from below and from the back. A hiking path has been cut into the hillside below, on the south side, but brush still covers much of the area.

I found these and a million more pictures and information at the following site and all credit goes to them.  I just had to share a few jewels here. Please go here for many, many, many more pictures of Old Hollywood!!

http://waterandpower.org/museum/Early_Views_of_Hollywood_%281920_+%29.html

 


Art Deco Society of California presents – Gatsby Summer Afternoon

 

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! Tickets are $40 for members and $50 for guests/non-members if purchased before Friday Sept 6. $70 for all at the door. Go to the ADSC website http://www.artdecosociety.org/ and buy with paypal OR download an order form and mail  it in.

What to expect at the Gatsby Summer Afternoon:

On the second Sunday in September the Art Deco Society of California hosts its annual Gatsby Summer Afternoon at the historic Dunsmuir Helman House in Oakland California.

The Gatsby Summer Afternoon lets several hundred aficionados of the 1920s and 30s step back to a time when elegance was a way of life and the Charleston and Fox Trot were all the rage. This is not a spectator event; every guest is part of the scene in their vintage best. From 1-6 p.m. the panoramic Dunsmuir front lawn becomes the stage on which all participants play, picnic, dance, and sip champagne; reminiscent of a scene from The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s famous novel of 1925.

Don Neely’s Royal Society Jazz Orchestra With Carla Normand
Dance to RSJO’S Authentic Jazz Era Arrangements

The Great Gatsby Bathing Beauty Revue With
The DecoBelles

Toast the Crowning of This Year’s Miss Art Deco

Grand Motor Car Exhibit
Enjoy Dozens of Art Deco Era Autos on Display

Wine Tasting
Wine provided by LeVin Winery—Commemorative Wine Glass $5

Dunsmuir House Tours
Complimentary House Tours 2pm to 3pm

Prizes will be awarded:
Best Auto, Best Costumes for Ladies, Gents and Children, Best Picnics, Petite to Grand, Best Charleston

A Fashion Parade at which you can show off your vintage style in a promenade before our stage!


About Silent Movies #8: How to get started watching silent movies

If you ever wanted to try Silent Films, here is your go to guide and why you should give them a try!!

Movies Silently

how-to-get-into-silent-films-header

One thing that I learned from writing this blog is that a lot of people want to get into silent movies but have not been able to for various reasons. Some don’t know where to begin. Some are intimidated by how different silents are from sound films. Some had a bad experience in Film 101 and are understandably wary.

Of course, plenty of folks get into silent films with no trouble at all but I thought it would be fun to write an encouraging post to help the viewers who may need a few tips or recommendations to get started.

Tip #1: Remember that silent films were made for viewers just like you

Popular entertainment was, of course, made for the everyman. However, as time marches on, references become obscure, language shifts, tastes change. As a result, yesteryear’s pop culture is often claimed by today’s academia. Now I have no…

View original post 1,291 more words


Bathing Beauties Barely Bare?!

  • Expansion of the railway system meant traveling to the coast became accessible to all
  • Reveal the demure all-in-one outfits worn by both men and women, including caps and shoes
  • The bathing machine was used to change into the cumbersome outfits in privacy
  • It was then wheeled right into the sea to allow bathers to enter the water in ease

100 years ago shows how people used to frolic in the sand in near head-to-toe outfits, complete with hats.

Before the 1900s women hit the waves in full gowns and bloomers but the impracticality of this meant that the all-in-one fitted beach suit began to be introduced for women as well as men.

Bathing belles show off the modest white cotton calf length long sleeved dresses, complete with bathing caps adorned with bobbles, on the beach at Southend-on-Sea, Essex in August 1919

A woman perches on the edge of a bathing machine parked in shallow sea on Ostend beach in July 1911

Ostend beach in Belgium in around 1900 when beach holidays began to become popular as the new railways allowed long distance travel at ease

The bathing machines would we wheeled right down into the water to allow the bather to enter the water with ease, a reduce the stares of other bathers

The bathing machines would we wheeled right down into the water to allow the bather to enter the water with ease, a reduce the stares of other bathers

Bathers dance hand in hand on the beach at Plymouth, Devon in July 1921 wearing rather unusual costumes that seem to have been inspired by Grecian togas


The New L.A. Folk Fest presents a “Happening” at HM157

Cover Photo

Return to the birthplace of the Folk Fest!
Featuring: The Americans, White Dove, Turn On The Sunlight, The Melodic, Emily Lacy, Kirpatrick (from Spindrift), Song Preservation Society, Ghiant, Vision Quest, Moomaw, Bloody Death Skull, AND MORE…As always, we will fit in as many bands as we can!
$20 ticket includes free drinks and other goodies! RSVP REQUIRED. RSVP on Facebook or email lafolkfest@gmail.com … We’re working on some big things, so this event is a fundraiser as much as it a way to get together and enjoy some summer fun.
Proceeds will also be donated to the California State Parks Foundation from this event & all events that we do between now and next summer. Save the parks!
Co-presented by The New LA Folk Fest, L.A. Record, and All Scene Eye
Want to participate? Sponsors, donors, services, volunteers, brands, contact lafolkfest@gmail.comHistorical Monument #157, also referred to as The Horace P Dibble House, is a community creative collective space on the California Historical landmark list, voted “Best Underground Date Night” and “Best Escape From Corporate Entertainment” by the L.A. Weekly.


Tidbits and Facts

Tear bottles: In some American Civil War stories, women were said to have cried into tear bottles and saved them until their husbands returned. Their collected tears would show the men how much they were loved and missed.

Tear bottles: In some American Civil War stories, women were said to have cried into tear bottles and saved them until their husbands returned. Their collected tears would show the men how much they were loved and missed.

Tear Bottles have been a part of our world’s history since before Christ’s time. Historians have found their evidence in ancient Rome and Egypt. Legend has it that our ancestors have used the small glass vessels to collect their tears, as a means for mourning and respect. Today, modern Tear Bottles are given to symbolize the emotions of love, joy, sorrow and remembrance. The gift of the tear bottle is often given at times of loss and bereavement, weddings, births, graduations, anniversaries and other rites of passage.  They are quickly becoming a popular heartfelt keepsake and gift item.

There is a sacredness in tears. They are not a mark of weakness, but of power. They speak more eloquently than ten thousand tongues. They are the messengers of overwhelming grief, of deep contrition and of unspeakable love.” – WASHINGTON IRVING

 


Interesting Photo NYC c. 1900 Street Cleaner


Now this is a hair raising event!!