What to do this Saturday Feb 8? How about a SPOOK SHOW!!

It’s back! 2nd Annual Spook Show at Halloween Club – La Mirada
Halloween Club is celebrating the club of Halloween Enthusiasts and cordially invites you for a conventry of local Halloween-esque
Art † Crafts † Curios † Jewelry † Props † Deco † Costumes † Food † Music † Contests † Spookiness † Creepiness …
Featuring:
† Abracadaver Productions † All Hallows Eve † Art & Clothing by Paulina † Batty Natty’s Baked Goods † Better Off Dead Designs † Bone Yard Effects, Inc. † Booger Vampire † Boyle Heights Paranormal Project † Captinis † CC Crafted Artists † Chimerical Media † Cinema Secrets † Danny Detox (Little Cave’s resident DJ) † Deathdolly13 † Deceased Art † Devilicious Food Truck † Diana Levin Art † Dignity Memorial † Dulce Calaveritas † Edge of the World Art Studio † Enchanted Rumors † Evile Annie † Face Paint From Mars † Fangoria † Fear Station Haunted Attraction † Foreplay Costumes † Fourbleboard † Frankenstein † From Zombies With Love † Grave Robbers Union Local 666 † Gurney FX † Hauntrepreneur Productions † Hearring Treasures † HeavenSent HellBent † Jimmy Psycho † Kristen Lawrence – Halloween Carols † Long Beach Acting & Film Association † Love Kills Boutique † Love, Pain and Stitches † Mint in Box Productions † Miss Wendy’s Bow-tique † Monster Buckles † Mommy’s Ghouls & Stitches † Moonlit Art Studio † Morgue Than Bows † Phantom Hearse Coaches † Plague Attire † Pocket Full of Posiez † Porko Rico BBQ Truck † Radio Active Chicken Heads † Rudy McBacon Enterprises † Savage Productions † ScareLA † Shadow Walk Productions † Shayne of the Dead † Spitfire Interiors † Stuff! by Nic † The Art of Reese † The Art of Rizzo Michelle † The Art of Sketch † The Melt Food Truck † The Rhythm Coffin † The Ridiculous & Grosstacular Sideshow † Tortilla Press † Tyrannical Piratical Treasures † Z Booth
WALKING DEAD CONTEST AND VIEWING!!!
14447 Firestone Blvd, La Mirada, California 90638
Tickets are FREE Woooo! but you must reserve them here:

What to do this Saturday in LA?

http://www.americancinemathequecalendar.com/content/the-roaring-twenties-california-alcohol-production-during-prohibition

Screening & Illustrated Talk! THE ROARING TWENTIES / California Alcohol Production During Prohibition Presented by the American Cinematheque and the Art Deco Society of Los Angeles
The afternoon begins with a 2PM screening of THE ROARING TWENTIES (see description below), followed by the illustrated talk:…
“California Alcohol Production During Prohibition,” 60 min. Chef, educator and historian Ernest Miller will take us back to Los Angeles before and during Prohibition to discover how some members of the local beer and wine industry survived by cleverly working around the Volstead Act’s ban on liquor. Chef Miller also will discuss what happened to the industry after Prohibition ended in December 1933. If not for Prohibition, Los Angeles might be a leader in wine and beer production today (the country’s largest winery was once located in Alhambra). Items used by alcohol manufacturers to make and advertise their product also will be displayed.
Following the lecture at 5:30 PM, members can join us at the Record Parlour (6408 Selma Ave., Hollywood) for libations and live music from Hedgehog Swing in celebration of the 80th anniversary of the repeal of the Volstead Act. Members of the Cinematheque and Art Deco Society will be e-mailed details on how to RSVP and obtain a password to enter this “speakeasy.”
75th Anniversary! THE ROARING TWENTIES 1939, Warner Bros., 106 min, USA, Dir: Raoul Walsh
Raoul Walsh came bursting onto the screen in his first Warner Bros. directorial outing with this sensational gangster tale starring James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart as World War I vets who return to an unwelcoming American society and go straight for the criminal life instead. With a script from crackerjack Warner Bros. writing team Jerry Wald and Richard Macauley, and produced by the incorrigible erstwhile journalist Mark Hellinger, this picture bristles with suspense, smart-aleck humor and Walsh’s great comic and dramatic timing. The triple threat of Cagney, Bogey and Walsh make for nonstop action and fun. A terrific round-up and look-back at the great Warner Bros. gangster yarns of the 1930s, this film says it all about how the studio kept in touch with the hard-knock life of the times. Also starring the inimitable Gladys George as Cagney’s saloon-owning friend and Pricilla Lane as the woman who just can’t love Cagney the way he wants. A blast of energy that is pure Walsh!
Tickets are $11 general admission and are available on Fandango.com

 


Stunning Zorita……

Adopted by strict Methodist parents as a child, she was discovered via a beauty pageant and became a burlesque artist in 1935. Her specialties were a twenty minute dance with two boa constrictors, `Elmer’ and `Oscar’, and her `Dance of the Wandering Hands’. It was only in 1954 that she stopped stripping, to run a number of different nightclubs in the New York and Miami areas. Although she taught younger girls routines, she refused to let go the secrets of her famous snake dance.

Zorita was  ‘Queen of the flashers,’  meaning that when the cops were not in attendence looking for a reason to shut it down, the audience would see alot more than the PoPo would. Zorita liked women more than men and never married but did date certain men and used them for all they were worth. She became very famous in the world of burlesque and by 1954 had retired from stripping while owning her own burlesques nightclubs in the New York and Miami areas. She appeared intermittently in films throughout her career. In 1974 she retired to Florida, where she bred Persian cats.

 

 


Up the River (1930) Spencer Tracy/Humphrey Bogart

Great movie!! Check it out!!

When paroled trustee Steve and former inmate Judy who try to put their criminal lives behind them are blackmailed, two career criminals come to their rescue.

 

Up the River (1930)


10 fun Edwardian facts

 

Edwardian England — 1901 – 1910 (though the era generally includes the years up to the Great War in 1914)

10. The speed limit for motorcars in 1902 was 12 mph, though Miss Dorothy Levitt set a world record for women by driving 91 mph that same year. She was forever being fined for breaking the speed limit, so she recommended that ladies join the Automobile Assocation (annual subscription–two guineas), whose ‘scouts’ would warn drivers of nearby speed traps.

9. The Ladies’ Automobile Association was founded in 1903, and the first president was the Baroness Campbell de Laurentz.

8. Shops catered to female motorists, providing flannel-lined leather motoring knickers, three-quarter length leather coats with storm fronts and sleeve wind guards, silk head-veils, tweed coats lined with fur or fleece, goggles, and special driving gloves.

8. Ladies also like to cycle, roller-skate (called ‘rinking’ then), play tennis and golf. Both Burberry and Harrod’s offerred specialty clothing for these activities, such as golf suits, golf knickers, cycling knickers, and even a special cycling skirt that divided at the back to fall ‘modestly’ on either side of the seat.

7. Speaking of clothing, the Edwardian lady wore *many* layers. The first undergarment layer was the ‘combinations’ –a sort of vest and pants in one, reaching to the knees (either with short sleeves, or shoulder straps). Over that, a lady wore a corset, its busks fastened with metal clips down the front, and laced up the back. Sometimes they would attach silk pads to the hips and under the arms to heighten the ‘hourglass’ look, making the waist appear more slender. Then came the camisole (sometimes called a ‘petticoat bodice’), sort of an under-blouse that buttoned up the front. Then came the knickers with lace frills at the knee–sometimes they buttoned at the waist, and sometimes they were tied with tapes (knickers and camisoles, by the way, were always white). Then came silk stockings–black, white, or grey–held up by garters. The last of the undergarments was the waist-petticoat made of silk or lawn. The waist-petticoat was tied around the waist. Finally, after all that, the lady would put on either a dress or skirt and blouse. If she wore a blouse and skirt, then she also wore a stiffened belt that fastened in the front and was pinned to the undergarments in the back so that there could never be a gap. Add to that hat, shoes, and gloves, and, well….just imagine how long it took to get dressed and undressed!

6. Electricity was widespread at this point, though some country houses were slower to convert than town houses and might, perhaps, still have gas lighting in the servants’ quarters.

5. Edwardian ladies loved cosmetics–and the fashionable look was unnaturally pale. The cosmetics of the era were chemical-based, rather than the herbal ones of earlier centuries, and were often very damaging to the skin. The first layer a lady might apply was a white face paint, made of white lead in a cream base, called ‘enamel.’ After that came rice powder or pearl powder, followed by rouge and lip-rouge. Some women had their lips and cheeks tattooed to stay permanently colored. Eye makeup generally wasn’t common except for eyebrow pencil, though the ladies sometimes brightened their eyes with the terribly dangerous drops of belladonna. Before 1909, women quietly shopped for cosmetics, heavily veiled, coming through back doors of salons. But in 1909, Gordon Selfridge opened a new store in Oxford Street where he placed cosmetics on open display and encouraged ladies to select and experiment. After that, other stores followed his lead and women began to purchase cosmetics out in the open.

4. As for scents, the most popular of the era was violet. Other popular scents included Jordan Water, Atkinson’s lavender, or heliotrope, orris root, or roses. The faint smell of sweat was referred to elegantly as “bouquet de corsage” and was claimed to be attractive to gentlemen (good thing, with all those layers of clothing!).

3. Brown hair was considered the height of fashion–particularly ‘nut brown’ hair or chestnut. It was considered very unfortunate during the Edwardian era to be blond.

2. There was a short-lived trend in the opening of the Edwardian era of breast piercing. The nipples were pierced and fitted with tiny gold rings said to improve the bust line and make it curvier, and to produce a pleasant sensation as the rings moved against the clothing.

1. Edwardian women were still mostly educated at home, taking lessons with their governesses. Some young ladies were sent to finishing school abroad–mostly France, Germany, and Switzerland–where, for two years they might learn French or German and social poise.

 

 


Trippy vintage GIFs

minnie-smallJust for fun 🙂

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Victorian Christmas Open House, Riverside, CA December 8, 2013

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Experience the Spirit of a Traditional Victorian Christmas

35th Annual Victorian Christmas Open House Sunday, December 8, 2013 | 12:00 – 4:00 pm | Free Heritage House | 8193 Magnolia Ave., Riverside
Step back in time and experience the spirit of a traditional Victorian  Christmas one would have seen in the 1890s. This family-friendly celebration  features Father Christmas; a unique range of musical entertainment which  includes caroling, autoharps, dulcimers, bagpipes, and a barbershop quartet;  home-baked sweets; and hot-mulled cider. Fresh-cut greens, handmade wreaths, and  mistletoe will adorn the home and one can enjoy making holiday ornaments and  decoupage a Christmas keepsake box. Heritage House is located at 8193 Magnolia  Ave. in Riverside. Free parking is available at the YWCA. The event is free and  open to the public. For more information about Heritage House, click here.

Event Parking: Due to limited parking at the Heritage House, please plan to park  on the street or across the street at the YWCA. Please note that the YWCA’s  parking gate will be locked after 4:30 pm.