Category Archives: Tidbits and Facts

Stunning Zorita……

Adopted by strict Methodist parents as a child, she was discovered via a beauty pageant and became a burlesque artist in 1935. Her specialties were a twenty minute dance with two boa constrictors, `Elmer’ and `Oscar’, and her `Dance of the Wandering Hands’. It was only in 1954 that she stopped stripping, to run a number of different nightclubs in the New York and Miami areas. Although she taught younger girls routines, she refused to let go the secrets of her famous snake dance.

Zorita was  ‘Queen of the flashers,’  meaning that when the cops were not in attendence looking for a reason to shut it down, the audience would see alot more than the PoPo would. Zorita liked women more than men and never married but did date certain men and used them for all they were worth. She became very famous in the world of burlesque and by 1954 had retired from stripping while owning her own burlesques nightclubs in the New York and Miami areas. She appeared intermittently in films throughout her career. In 1974 she retired to Florida, where she bred Persian cats.

 

 

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10 fun Edwardian facts

 

Edwardian England — 1901 – 1910 (though the era generally includes the years up to the Great War in 1914)

10. The speed limit for motorcars in 1902 was 12 mph, though Miss Dorothy Levitt set a world record for women by driving 91 mph that same year. She was forever being fined for breaking the speed limit, so she recommended that ladies join the Automobile Assocation (annual subscription–two guineas), whose ‘scouts’ would warn drivers of nearby speed traps.

9. The Ladies’ Automobile Association was founded in 1903, and the first president was the Baroness Campbell de Laurentz.

8. Shops catered to female motorists, providing flannel-lined leather motoring knickers, three-quarter length leather coats with storm fronts and sleeve wind guards, silk head-veils, tweed coats lined with fur or fleece, goggles, and special driving gloves.

8. Ladies also like to cycle, roller-skate (called ‘rinking’ then), play tennis and golf. Both Burberry and Harrod’s offerred specialty clothing for these activities, such as golf suits, golf knickers, cycling knickers, and even a special cycling skirt that divided at the back to fall ‘modestly’ on either side of the seat.

7. Speaking of clothing, the Edwardian lady wore *many* layers. The first undergarment layer was the ‘combinations’ –a sort of vest and pants in one, reaching to the knees (either with short sleeves, or shoulder straps). Over that, a lady wore a corset, its busks fastened with metal clips down the front, and laced up the back. Sometimes they would attach silk pads to the hips and under the arms to heighten the ‘hourglass’ look, making the waist appear more slender. Then came the camisole (sometimes called a ‘petticoat bodice’), sort of an under-blouse that buttoned up the front. Then came the knickers with lace frills at the knee–sometimes they buttoned at the waist, and sometimes they were tied with tapes (knickers and camisoles, by the way, were always white). Then came silk stockings–black, white, or grey–held up by garters. The last of the undergarments was the waist-petticoat made of silk or lawn. The waist-petticoat was tied around the waist. Finally, after all that, the lady would put on either a dress or skirt and blouse. If she wore a blouse and skirt, then she also wore a stiffened belt that fastened in the front and was pinned to the undergarments in the back so that there could never be a gap. Add to that hat, shoes, and gloves, and, well….just imagine how long it took to get dressed and undressed!

6. Electricity was widespread at this point, though some country houses were slower to convert than town houses and might, perhaps, still have gas lighting in the servants’ quarters.

5. Edwardian ladies loved cosmetics–and the fashionable look was unnaturally pale. The cosmetics of the era were chemical-based, rather than the herbal ones of earlier centuries, and were often very damaging to the skin. The first layer a lady might apply was a white face paint, made of white lead in a cream base, called ‘enamel.’ After that came rice powder or pearl powder, followed by rouge and lip-rouge. Some women had their lips and cheeks tattooed to stay permanently colored. Eye makeup generally wasn’t common except for eyebrow pencil, though the ladies sometimes brightened their eyes with the terribly dangerous drops of belladonna. Before 1909, women quietly shopped for cosmetics, heavily veiled, coming through back doors of salons. But in 1909, Gordon Selfridge opened a new store in Oxford Street where he placed cosmetics on open display and encouraged ladies to select and experiment. After that, other stores followed his lead and women began to purchase cosmetics out in the open.

4. As for scents, the most popular of the era was violet. Other popular scents included Jordan Water, Atkinson’s lavender, or heliotrope, orris root, or roses. The faint smell of sweat was referred to elegantly as “bouquet de corsage” and was claimed to be attractive to gentlemen (good thing, with all those layers of clothing!).

3. Brown hair was considered the height of fashion–particularly ‘nut brown’ hair or chestnut. It was considered very unfortunate during the Edwardian era to be blond.

2. There was a short-lived trend in the opening of the Edwardian era of breast piercing. The nipples were pierced and fitted with tiny gold rings said to improve the bust line and make it curvier, and to produce a pleasant sensation as the rings moved against the clothing.

1. Edwardian women were still mostly educated at home, taking lessons with their governesses. Some young ladies were sent to finishing school abroad–mostly France, Germany, and Switzerland–where, for two years they might learn French or German and social poise.

 

 


Some fabulous Halloween Gifs!


What is this “Halloween” holiday anyway??!

Like many holiday’s these days, we play the marketing game and buy, buy, buy everything they tell us and end up broke until January. Also, like many holidays, most people do not know the history and origins of many of our traditions.  Here are some fun Halloween facts for you to get hip on and hopefully share with your kids so they also know what Halloween is all about!

Halloween’s roots can be traced back to Celtic culture in Ireland.  According to their “Druid” religion, November 1st was New Years’ on their calendar.   The celebration would begin on October 31st ,and last into the following day. The spirits of all who died in the prior year, would rise up and roam the earth on this night.  This is an evil night when spirits roamed the streets and villages. Lord Samhain, the lord of Darkness, would arrive in search of the spirits to take  them to the underworld.

  • Orange and black are Halloween colors because orange is associated with the Fall harvest and black is associated with darkness and death.
  • Jack o’ Lanterns originated in Ireland where people placed candles in hollowed-out turnips to keep away spirits and ghosts on the Samhain holiday.
  • Pumpkins also come in white, blue and green. Great for unique monster carvings!
  • Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who would celebrate the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance and tell fortunes.
  • Tootsie Rolls were the first wrapped penny candy in America.
  • The ancient Celts thought that spirits and ghosts roamed the countryside on Halloween night. They began wearing masks and costumes to avoid being recognized as human.
  • Halloween candy sales average about 2 billion dollars annually in the United States.
  • Chocolate candy bars top the list as the most popular candy for trick-or-treaters with Snickers #1.
  • Halloween is the 2nd most commercially successful holiday, with Christmas being the first.
  • Bobbing for apples is thought to have originated from the roman harvest festival that honors Pamona, the goddess of fruit trees.
  • Black cats were once believed to be witch’s familiars who protected their powers.

Some people view Halloween as a time for fun, putting on costumes, trick-or-treating, and having theme parties. Others view it as a time of superstitions, ghosts, goblins and evil spirits that should be avoided at all costs.

As the Christian debate goes on, celebrating Halloween is a preference that is not always viewed as participating in an evil holiday. Halloween is often celebrated with no reference to pagan rituals or the occult.

Traditional activities include trick-or-treating, bonfires, costume parties, visiting “haunted houses” and carving jack-o-lanterns. Irish and Scottish immigrants carried versions of the tradition to North America in the nineteenth century. Other western countries embraced the holiday in the late twentieth century including Ireland, the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom as well as of Australia and New Zealand.

Have a safe and fun holiday season.

 


Happy 75th anniversary Wizard of Oz

Wow, has it really been 75 years?? Yes it has.

To celebrate they are showing it in 3D at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood.

http://www.ticketmaster.com/venueartist/90160/887597?brand=pantagesca

http://thewizardofoz.warnerbros.com/

To celebrate here are some great behind the scene shots from the movie!!

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Victorian tea cups for men??! Who knew?

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Many Victorian men where known for their mustaches.  As a mater of fact they were judged by the size of their mustaches, so obviously this caused for embarrassing moments during tea time. 😉 So, the teacup for men was invented!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moustache_cup

“The moustache cup is a drinking cup with a semicircular ledge inside. The ledge has a half moon-shaped opening to allow the passage of liquids and serves as a guard to keep moustaches dry. It is generally acknowledged to have been invented in the 1860s by British potter Harvey Adams (born 1835).

Moustaches flourished throughout the Victorian era. Often, moustache wax was applied to the moustache to keep it nice and stiff, with every hair in place. And therein lay a problem that cropped up when steaming hot cups of tea or coffee were carried up to the mouth for sipping: the steam melted the wax and sent it right into the cup. Another problem soon became apparent. Sipping hot tea or coffee, moustaches also often became stained. Finally, Harvey Adams, an innovative Englishman, in 1860 came up with an unusual invention, “the moustache cup”. The latter had a ledge, called a moustache guard, across the cup. The ledge had one semicircular opening against the side of the cup. The pampered moustache then rested safe and dry on the guard while sipping a hot beverage through the opening. The new invention spread all over the European continent and soon, every famous potter was making the new cups. A multiplicity of moustache cups were made by famous manufactories such as Meissen, Royal Crown Derby, Imari, Royal Bayreuth, Limoges and others. Each potter created his own version of this masculine tableware and the news of that invention soon spread to America.”

Vintage Victorian Image Digital Download Tag Advertisement Card Scrapbook - Moustache Mustache Wax


Let’s get a little twisted…Vintage Serial Killer HH Holmes

There is a great documentary on him on Netflix I definitely recommend!! I was glued to my seat by the thought that was put into his plot and how easy it was to get a way with it back then.  If you disappeared no one could notice for months or even years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._H._Holmes

Herman Webster Mudgett (May 16, 1861[1] – May 7, 1896[2]), better known under the alias of Dr. Henry Howard Holmes, was one of the first documented American serial killers in the modern sense of the term. In Chicago at the time of the 1893 World’s Fair, Holmes opened a hotel which he had designed and built for himself specifically with murder in mind, and which was the location of many of his murders. While he confessed to 27 murders, of which four were confirmed, his actual body count could be as high as 200.[3] He took an unknown number of his victims from the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, which was less than two miles away, to his “World’s Fair” hotel.

Holmes had acquired a vacant lot on the corner of Wallace and 63rd Street, Chicago, shortly before the Fair’s opening, and had quickly built his three-story block long “Castle” on the site. The ground floor contained only run of the mill shops, including Holmes’s drugstore, but the upper two floors gained international notoriety after they were found to contain, apart from innocent seeming guest suites, a maze of over one hundred interconnected hallways and smaller rooms. Blind corridors, secret passageways and senseless stairways that lead nowhere abounded and at least one chute lead directly from the suites down into Holmes’s basement torture chambers.

Holmes was not picky and his victims were culled mainly from ex-lovers who had originally been tricked into visiting him by reading his enticing advertisements in lonely hearts’ publications. He also preyed freely on hotel guests and hotel employees. He usually killed his victims by gassing them in the hotel rooms, whose doors, once closed, could not be opened from the inside. He would then maneuver the corpses down to the basement via the chute. Once in the basement, he either dismembered the bodies and disposed of the pieces in lime pits, or dissected them and sold the skeletons to a nearby medical school. He also apparently ran an abortion clinic from the hotel premises but this clinic quickly gained a reputation for one where the patients had an extremely high fatality rate …

Holmes also forced all of his employees to take out insurance policies on their lives with him as their beneficiary. After these employees had disappeared, and were presumed dead by the various insurance companies involved, Holmes would then cash the policies in. And although this happened time and time again, no one realized that Holmes was killing these people simply to file claims on their policies. Towards the end of his career, Holmes rightly considered himself to be an expert on insurance fraud and it is therefore ironic that, despite his undeniable talent in this area, he was finally brought low because of a botched insurance scam.