Category Archives: Culture

Vintage 101: Who are these girls called…”flappers”?

Flappers were a “new breed” of young Western women in the 1920s who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair, listened to jazz, and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behavior. Flappers were seen as brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms.[1] Flappers had their origins in the liberal period of the Roaring Twenties, the social, political turbulence and increased transatlantic cultural exchange that followed the end of World War I, as well as the export of American jazz culture to Europe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flapper

OH MY!

The slang word flapper, describing a young woman, is sometimes supposed to refer to a young bird flapping its wings while learning to fly. However, it may derive from an earlier use in northern England to mean teenage girl, referring to one whose hair is not yet put up and whose plaited pigtail flapped on her back;[2] or from an older word meaning prostitute.[3]

The slang word “flap” is known to have been used for a young prostitute as early as 1631.[4] By the 1890s the word “flapper” was emerging in England as popular slang both for a very young prostitute,[5][6] and in a more general – and less derogatory sense – of any lively mid-teenage girl.[7]

In the 1920s, however, many Americans found the flapper incredibly threatening. Flappers represented a new moral order.  Although they were the daughters of the middle class, they flouted middle-class values.   They shrugged off their chaperones.  Worse still, they danced suggestively and openly flirted with boys.  Flappers prized style over substance, novelty over tradition, and pleasure over virtue.

 


Old Hollywood like you have never seen before 1920s style…!!

If you are from Southern California, and frequent the downtown Los Angeles and the immediate surrounding areas, then all of the pictures below are really going to hit home.  I can honestly say I have been to every one of these areas and it amazes me to see how it all began.  Enjoy!!

(1922)*^ – Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks hang the entrance signs for their Pickford-Fairbanks Studios in Hollywood.

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(ca. 1923)^# – About a dozen men cheering for the camera in what seems to be the completion of an early phase of the new housing development project. At the same time, construction crews appear to still be working.

(ca. 1924)* – Three cars are parked in the street in front of a sign for Hollywoodland sales. To the right is the tract office building. Behind that another building is under construction. Another at the top of the hill looks nearly finished.

(ca. 1924)* – The construction sign in back reads “You are now in Hollywoodland, Tray E. Shoults Co.”. In the street in front of the Tract Office and other buildings approx. 70 men in a line 2 to 3 rows deep stand at the gates of Beachwood Drive.

(ca. 1920s)* – Intersection of Sunset and Cahuenga boulevards with heavy traffic going in all directions. The tall tower in the center of the photo is the Hollywood Athletic Club.

Historical Notes

When the Hollywood Athletic Club was first built in 1924, Hollywood was entering its greatest and most productive period. The building was the tallest building in Hollywood and loomed above Sunset Boulevard. Membership was originally $150 for initiation fees and $10 for monthly dues.

During its early years as a health club, its membership included Johnny Weissmuller, Errol Flynn, Charlie Chaplin, John Wayne, Walt Disney, John Ford, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., Mary Pickford, Cecil B de Mille, Cornel Wilde, Humphrey Bogart, Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, Frances X. Bushman, Howard Hughes, Joan Crawford and Rudolph Valentino, Mae West, Walt Disney, and Buster Crabbe.*^

(1929)* – Street view of the Hollywood Athletic Club, located at 6525 Sunset Blvd.

(1922)* – Around 50,000 people gathered for the Easter sunrise service in the Hollywood Bowl. An even larger crowd was expected there on Easter morning when the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra played for the worshipers. The Hollywood Bowl would officially be opened four months later (July 11, 1922).

(ca. 1923)* – Bird’s eye view looking west on Hollywood Blvd. at Cahuenga circa 1923.

(ca. 1923)* – A view of the courtyard of Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre with statues of an Egyptian king, Indian elephants. Billboard advertising for Douglas Fairbanks “The Thief of Bagdad.” The theatre opened in 1922 and was designed by architects Meyer & Holler.

Historical Notes

The Egyptian Theatre was the venue for the first-ever Hollywood premiere, Robin Hood, starring Douglas Fairbanks, on Wednesday, October 18, 1922. As the film reportedly cost over $1 million to produce, the admission price to the premiere was $5.00. One could reserve a seat up to two weeks in advance for the daily performances. Evening admission was 75¢, $1.00 or $1.50. The film was not shown in any other Los Angeles theater during that year.

(1927)* – Night view shows theater lights and throngs of fans packing the streets for blocks around Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. Publicity of Hollywood premiers usually brought stars and other distinguished visitors to magnificent events such as the one seen here – possibly the opening night of a movie starring Douglas Fairbanks.

(1928)* – Marquee says to “Watch for the Grand Opening” of Warner Bros. Theatre in Hollywood.

(1928)* – A customer gets full service at the gas pumps at Muller Bros. Service Station on Sunset Blvd.

Historical Notes

The Muller Brothers Service Station was located across Sunset Boulevard on 4 acres, where the Cinerama Dome Theater is now located. Opened in 1920 by the Muller brothers, Walter and Frank, this became the largest service station in the world (including a large automobile supply center), employing 120 people by 1937. Celebrities, from Rudolph Valentino to Clark Gable, came by regularly to get gas or just work on their cars. In 1963 the site was sold for the Cinerama Dome Theater, and, at that time, an eventual hotel.

(ca. 1928)* – Exterior view of the Gower Street entrance of the RKO Studios, located on Gower Street and Melrose Avenue in Hollywood. The studios were established by Robertson-Cole in 1921 and are now owned by CBS Paramount Television. RKO is short for Radio-Keith-Orpheum.

(ca. 1930s)^ – Carpenter’s Sandwich drive-in on Sunset and Vine. Two carhops are posing for the camera by the counter while another to the right appears to be serving food.

(1933)* – A man sits on a steel girder on the half-completed dome of the Griffith Observatory as other construction workers are on scaffolds on the building behind the dome. Construction rubble is scattered around the Observatory’s foundation.

(1934)* – The Griffith Observatory and the main building, the planetarium, are seen from below and from the back. A hiking path has been cut into the hillside below, on the south side, but brush still covers much of the area.

I found these and a million more pictures and information at the following site and all credit goes to them.  I just had to share a few jewels here. Please go here for many, many, many more pictures of Old Hollywood!!

http://waterandpower.org/museum/Early_Views_of_Hollywood_%281920_+%29.html

 


Art Deco Society of California presents – Gatsby Summer Afternoon

 

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY! Tickets are $40 for members and $50 for guests/non-members if purchased before Friday Sept 6. $70 for all at the door. Go to the ADSC website http://www.artdecosociety.org/ and buy with paypal OR download an order form and mail  it in.

What to expect at the Gatsby Summer Afternoon:

On the second Sunday in September the Art Deco Society of California hosts its annual Gatsby Summer Afternoon at the historic Dunsmuir Helman House in Oakland California.

The Gatsby Summer Afternoon lets several hundred aficionados of the 1920s and 30s step back to a time when elegance was a way of life and the Charleston and Fox Trot were all the rage. This is not a spectator event; every guest is part of the scene in their vintage best. From 1-6 p.m. the panoramic Dunsmuir front lawn becomes the stage on which all participants play, picnic, dance, and sip champagne; reminiscent of a scene from The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s famous novel of 1925.

Don Neely’s Royal Society Jazz Orchestra With Carla Normand
Dance to RSJO’S Authentic Jazz Era Arrangements

The Great Gatsby Bathing Beauty Revue With
The DecoBelles

Toast the Crowning of This Year’s Miss Art Deco

Grand Motor Car Exhibit
Enjoy Dozens of Art Deco Era Autos on Display

Wine Tasting
Wine provided by LeVin Winery—Commemorative Wine Glass $5

Dunsmuir House Tours
Complimentary House Tours 2pm to 3pm

Prizes will be awarded:
Best Auto, Best Costumes for Ladies, Gents and Children, Best Picnics, Petite to Grand, Best Charleston

A Fashion Parade at which you can show off your vintage style in a promenade before our stage!


The New L.A. Folk Fest presents a “Happening” at HM157

Cover Photo

Return to the birthplace of the Folk Fest!
Featuring: The Americans, White Dove, Turn On The Sunlight, The Melodic, Emily Lacy, Kirpatrick (from Spindrift), Song Preservation Society, Ghiant, Vision Quest, Moomaw, Bloody Death Skull, AND MORE…As always, we will fit in as many bands as we can!
$20 ticket includes free drinks and other goodies! RSVP REQUIRED. RSVP on Facebook or email lafolkfest@gmail.com … We’re working on some big things, so this event is a fundraiser as much as it a way to get together and enjoy some summer fun.
Proceeds will also be donated to the California State Parks Foundation from this event & all events that we do between now and next summer. Save the parks!
Co-presented by The New LA Folk Fest, L.A. Record, and All Scene Eye
Want to participate? Sponsors, donors, services, volunteers, brands, contact lafolkfest@gmail.comHistorical Monument #157, also referred to as The Horace P Dibble House, is a community creative collective space on the California Historical landmark list, voted “Best Underground Date Night” and “Best Escape From Corporate Entertainment” by the L.A. Weekly.


Tidbits and Facts

Tear bottles: In some American Civil War stories, women were said to have cried into tear bottles and saved them until their husbands returned. Their collected tears would show the men how much they were loved and missed.

Tear bottles: In some American Civil War stories, women were said to have cried into tear bottles and saved them until their husbands returned. Their collected tears would show the men how much they were loved and missed.

Tear Bottles have been a part of our world’s history since before Christ’s time. Historians have found their evidence in ancient Rome and Egypt. Legend has it that our ancestors have used the small glass vessels to collect their tears, as a means for mourning and respect. Today, modern Tear Bottles are given to symbolize the emotions of love, joy, sorrow and remembrance. The gift of the tear bottle is often given at times of loss and bereavement, weddings, births, graduations, anniversaries and other rites of passage.  They are quickly becoming a popular heartfelt keepsake and gift item.

There is a sacredness in tears. They are not a mark of weakness, but of power. They speak more eloquently than ten thousand tongues. They are the messengers of overwhelming grief, of deep contrition and of unspeakable love.” – WASHINGTON IRVING

 


Culture is calling! Though Aug. 9: Frida Kahlo Exhibit at Corazon de Los Angeles on Olvera Street

What better place to view such lovely art than in the historic downtown Los Angeles Olvera Street.  Frida Kahlo Exhibit at Corazon de Los Angeles on Olvera Street. Mixed media, multi-artist exhibit features George Yepes, Yolanda Gonzalez, Magda Bowen, Lani Cupchoy, Mirlette Islas, Lorena Rivera, Jorge Guillen, Johnny Rivera & array of Frida themed nichos & jewelry.  Corazon is located at W-19A (upstairs) Olvera St./634 N. Main St. LA 90012. For more information, call (323) 341-7970, email info@corazonla.com or on Facebook Corazon-de-Los-Angeles-at-Olvera-Street.

Pictured: “Frida on Wood ” by Maria Kane

Frida, Original on Wood-By Maria Kane 1


San Bernardino Art + Film Lab Friday, July 26–Sunday, August 25, 2013

Friday, July 26–Sunday, August 25, 2013 Perris Hill Park in San Bernardino is the second site for the LACMA9 Art + Film Lab.  Area residents are invited to participate in free film workshops, an oral history project, outdoor film screenings, plus a free day at LACMA. Presented by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in collaboration with the City of San Bernardino Parks and Recreation and the Arts Council.

About the City of San Bernardino Located south of the San Bernardino Mountains and west of the lower desert, San Bernardino is known for its scenic beauty and strategic location.  It is the largest city in the County of San Bernardino with a population of over 200,000 people.  Early influences of Native Americans, Mexican settlers, Spanish missionaries and Mormon emigrants still echo throughout the city today forming a community rich in history and cultural diversity. Known as LACMA9 Art + Film Lab, the project opens its doors Friday, June 7, at the University of Redlands. The structure consists of three elements: a computer lab, an art-making space and an audiovisual lab, each housed in a trailer-like room radiating from a central hub.

A screen installed between two of the sections will be used for nighttime movie presentations. All the programs are free. The workshops, on topics such as documentary making, composition and sound design, will be offered in the first two rooms. The audiovisual lab will host oral history sessions, in which members of the public can talk about their lives. “People will record a story about their community or a significant story in their life,” said Sarah Jesse, the art museum’s associate vice president of education. “If they bring a flash drive, they can take (a copy of the session) with them.” The lab will be at the Redlands site until July 7. From July 26 to Aug. 25, it will be at Perris Hill Park in San Bernardino, next to the senior center.

 

LACMA9 Art + Film Lab The project of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will be visiting the Inland area through August. June 7-July 7: University of Redlands, Brockton and University avenues July 26-Aug. 25: Perris Hill Park, 780 E. 21st St., San Bernardino Oral history hours: 3-6 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4-6 p.m. Sunday. Redlands workshops: Mini Docs: noon-3 p.m. June 15 and 29 Soundscapes: 1-4 p.m. June 16 and 30 Instant Film: noon-3 p.m. June 22 and July 6 Composition: 1-4 p.m. June 23 and July 7 Sign-ups start one hour before the workshops. Information: 323-857-6000