Monthly Archives: June 2013

Welcome to the world of working out…vintage style!

Wooden treadmills and Mary Janes: Workouts 1920s style were a glamorous, if low-tech, affair

Exercise clothing of the era was  either a  cotton singlet with shorts or, going back a few more decades to the Victorian  era of the late 1800s, the smart tailoring that would  have been worn as day to  day dress.  Definitely not something comfortable…comfort for women has always seemed forbidden!

1921
Pedalling across the water: Passengers of the doomed Titanic on the exercise bikes in the boat's gymnasium, built in 1910

Passengers of the doomed Titanic, which sunk in 1912, on exercise bikes in the  boat’s gymnasium wearing their extravagant cruise outfits, again, does not look very breathable or designed for comfort.
That thing looks dangerous! A woman demonstrating an exercise machine, known as the Gymo Frame, to members of the Arsenal soccer team at Highbury football ground in London, UK, in 1932

A woman demonstrating an exercise machine, known as the Gymo Frame.

Victorian: Engravings showing physiotherapy machines from 1895, taken from an edition of Meyers Konversations-Lexikon, a 19th century German encyclopedia

I’m not sure how well these worked but whatever gets your heart pumping!! Hope you enjoyed!


The Hitchcock 9 at LACMA

wow this sounds awesome!

HITCHCOCK'S VERTIGO

The Hitchcock 9

 

In partnership with the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, LACMA is proud to be the Los Angeles venue for this monumental touring series that presents, for the first time ever, all nine of Alfred Hitchcock’s surviving silent films in gorgeous new digital restorations from the British Film Institute. This series includes Hitchcock’s directorial debut—The Pleasure Garden, made when he was just 25—as well as beloved masterworks such as the expressionistic The Lodger and his seminal thrillerBlackmail. The series tracks how Hitchcock’s style developed over three short yet productive years as he transitioned from an UFA-steeped upstart to a world-class British auteur. Launching with the little-seen seaside melodrama The Manxman—featuring a new score written and performed by Stephen Horne—The Hitchcock 9 is a rare opportunity to experience the fascinating evolution of a cinematic genius.

Special support provided by the…

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Attn: Glendale, June 30th

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June 29, 2013 – Silverado, CA Vintage Choppers!!

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Vintage Medicine – Morphine, Meth, Weed, Cocaine, and Heroin on the menu

 

Morphine, meth, weed, cocaine and heroin are just a few of the medications used back in the day to cure things like sore throats and tooth aches. Yowza!

Cocaine drops

Lloyd Cocaine Toothache Drops

Cocaine was sold over-the-counter until 1914, which was otherwise known as the good old days.

cocaine-toothache “Not recommended for children under 6” WTH??!!

cocaine-toothache

Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup

With 65 mg of morphine per fluid ounce, it’ll cure the aches associated with teething, and life in general.

cocaine-toothacheGorgeous Vintage Advertisements for Heroin, Cannabis and Cocaine

Gorgeous Vintage Advertisements for Heroin, Cannabis and CocaineGorgeous Vintage Advertisements for Heroin, Cannabis and Cocaine

Originally intended as a patent medicine when it was invented in 1886 by John Pemberton. He used five ounces of coca leaf (141.7 g) per gallon of syrup in the first five years, but the company was bought by businessman Asa Griggs Candler in 1891, who claimed his formula contained only 0.5 ounces. (14.2 g)

Gorgeous Vintage Advertisements for Heroin, Cannabis and Cocaine

Gorgeous Vintage Advertisements for Heroin, Cannabis and Cocaine

Gorgeous Vintage Advertisements for Heroin, Cannabis and Cocaine

A mixture of opium and alcohol helped infants and little children to fall asleep, eeeeeeek!!


Tidbits and Facts

Here is what I can find as the first documented photograph ever taken with a person in it. 1838 in Paris.

Pakistan 1864

The first photographic studio 1893

 


Today in History, June 20, 1947 – Bugsy Siegel

On June 20, 1947, mobster Bugsy Siegel was gunned down in Beverly Hills.

On June 20, 1947, mobster Bugsy Siegel was gunned down in Beverly Hills. Bye-bye, Bugsy!

Born in Brooklyn on February 28, 1906, Bugsy Siegel built a criminal empire through bootlegging, gambling and ruthless assassinations before setting up shop in Las Vegas. He opened the famous Flamingo Hotel and Casino, the start of his notorious gambling operation in the middle of the Las Vegas desert.

On the evening of June 20, 1947, Siegel was brutally killed, when a  fusillade of bullets crashed through his living room window in Beverly  Hills. Simultaneously, three of Lansky’s cohorts entered the Flamingo  Hotel and declared a takeover. Although Lansky denied involvement in the  hit, there is little doubt that Siegel was murdered on syndicate  orders.